Top Audiophile quality recordings

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treitz3
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Hugh Mesekela's "Stimela" [The coal train]...

Post by treitz3 » Sat Aug 13, 2011 8:19 am

TNRabbit wrote:Carlos Franzetti sounds like a very young Frank Sinatra (only better)~
I agree completely with no reservations.

Well, as far as Hugh Masekela's "Stimela" goes? Skip the CD IMO, unless you just dig his music [which I do]. The CD is "Hope" and today was the first time I have listened to it. Definitely some cool music but when I skipped on over to track 12, which is Stimela, I knew as soon as sound started that this was not in the same class as the Burmester SACD. The dynamics were reduced by an estimated 10%, it sounded immediately veiled and all of the impact that really makes this recording what it is just isn't there. I guess if you hadn't been introduced to the SACD first, one may love it as is but you can not go backwards on this one. Burmester just flat out nailed this one!

Gary, I just plopped in Rebecca Pidgeon's Spanish Harlem and I heard the pop at the beginning. That's not when the pencil breaks. I think what you heard, you accurately described the description of. You had mentioned that it was more likely someone shifting in their seat or possibly the floor creaking underneath a weight shift. I agree. As for when the pencil snaps, Aiden has to get out of the house. I can't hear my self think, let alone try to hear a pencil snap with him in the room. I'll let you know more when I have some silence in the house.
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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by Chauss » Sat Aug 13, 2011 11:45 am

The Raven (Chesky Records JD115) Track 12 at 22 sec. (Spanish Harlem original studio recording) there is a snap to her rear left- but I do not think it is someone stepping on a pencil. Probably one of the musicians....maybe the guy picking up his maracas or something maybe he tapped them together by accident or something or the floor- maybe a pencil? (but why would someone have a pencil in a recording studio?) Same are of the soundstage that the maraca player is in is where the snap comes from .....THAT..... I CAN determine for sure! :D
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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by Zoot Horn » Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:59 pm

Try Nils Lofgren Live---Keith don't go

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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by OconeeOrange » Sat Aug 13, 2011 4:12 pm

I was just playing Scepter Records S-501. That is an album by The Shirelles. On the 5th track, side two about 43 seconds in to the song "Unlucky", I am sure I heard Shirley Owens fart. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:



... or maybe that was me !

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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by BillD » Sat Aug 13, 2011 4:23 pm

It was you.

For a fart to go down to the echo room for the wall of sound and come back would be something.
It should sound like it isn't there!
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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by Chauss » Sat Aug 13, 2011 4:49 pm

OconeeOrange wrote:I was just playing Scepter Records S-501. That is an album by The Shirelles. On the 5th track, side two about 43 seconds in to the song "Unlucky", I am sure I heard Shirley Owens fart. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:



... or maybe that was me !
I do not think it was a fart.... :lol: :lol: :lol:
Last edited by Chauss on Sat Aug 13, 2011 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by OconeeOrange » Sat Aug 13, 2011 5:50 pm

BillD wrote:It was you.

For a fart to go down to the echo room for the wall of sound and come back would be something.
Maybe, but that is a very big girl. :-"

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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by TNRabbit » Sun Aug 14, 2011 4:50 am

OconeeOrange wrote:I was just playing Scepter Records S-501. That is an album by The Shirelles. On the 5th track, side two about 43 seconds in to the song "Unlucky", I am sure I heard Shirley Owens fart.


... or maybe that was me !
:lol: :lol: :lol: =D> =D> =D>
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Lot's o' new sound to listen too!!!

Post by treitz3 » Sun Aug 14, 2011 8:04 am

Well, I just got in a shipment of some supposedly really well recorded music. Here's a list of what just hit the door...

Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris - Real *LIVE* Roadrunning
Mark Knopfler - Golden Heart
Mark Knopfler - The Ragpickers Dream
Mark Knopfler - Shangrila
Bad Influence - Live at the Bad Habits Cafe' - from Mapleshade
Electric Blues Doctor *LIVE* - Drink Small - from Mapleshade
Sweetman - Austin Backalley Blue - from Mapleshade
Clifford Jordan Quartet - *LIVE* at Ethell's - from Mapleshade
Big Joe Maher, Jeff Sarli w/ Big Blues band - Mojo - from Mapleshade
Muddy Waters - Folk Singer - 24K Gold from Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs

I'll let you know my impressions of each as I listen to them. That's a lot of music, so give me some time to post my observations.

You know, maybe I missed it being posted but I was thinkin' of Donald Fagan's "Morph the Cat" today. If it hasn't been mentioned here before, it is definitely worthy of mentioning. This is one of those that isn't just a particular song that's well recorded, the entire album is well recorded and will make most any system shine. It's also a great CD to test out your corner loading and bass response when using the Sumiko system to set up your speakers.
In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence.

The best way to enjoy digital music reproduction is to never listen to a good analogue reproduction.

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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by engtaz » Sun Aug 14, 2011 9:57 am

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Re: Lot's o' new sound to listen too!!!

Post by stereo_buff » Sun Aug 14, 2011 1:25 pm

treitz3 wrote:You know, maybe I missed it being posted but I was thinkin' of Donald Fagan's "Morph the Cat" today. If it hasn't been mentioned here before, it is definitely worthy of mentioning. This is one of those that isn't just a particular song that's well recorded, the entire album is well recorded and will make most any system shine. It's also a great CD to test out your corner loading and bass response when using the Sumiko system to set up your speakers.
Most of Steely Dan and Donald Fagen's work are exceptionally well recorded, in particular, of the former, The Royal Scam, Aja, and Gaucho.

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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by OconeeOrange » Sat Aug 20, 2011 11:25 pm

One of my favorites is James Moody, I have a couple, but this is my favorite:
Moody Plays Mancini.jpg
Moody Plays Mancini.jpg (18.97 KiB) Viewed 1796 times
New they can go high, but good used copies can be found cheap.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00000 ... -1&seller=

Give this guy a play and you will see he is very entertaining. He even sings a little on this one.

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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by Chauss » Sun Aug 21, 2011 9:57 am

Here is an interesting read on the making of Miles Davis- Kind of Blue:


Between Takes: The 'Kind Of Blue' Sessions

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... d=99805408

Miles Davis, alone in the studio.

January 29, 2009 - These days, an official request to review the reel-to-reel tapes from a typical Columbia Records recording session in the late '50s — say Johnny Mathis, Duke Ellington or Doris Day — brings up boxes upon boxes of reels. But Miles Davis' Kind of Blue sessions hardly dented the tape budget. Three reels of Scotch 190, at the time a workhorse product of the recording industry, hold all that was recorded at those two historic dates in 1959.

It's not much, but it reveals a lot. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Kind of Blue, and Sony Legacy (which owns the Columbia catalog) has issued a 2-CD/1-DVD box set that includes the music, an ornate book, a vinyl copy of the original LP release and, for the first time, snippets of studio chatter. For listeners, it's the closest we can come to witnessing the making of a melodic masterpiece. For Davis and saxophonists John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Jimmy Cobb, Kind of Blue was simply another day at work.

From his liner notes to the Kind of Blue reissue, excerpted below, music writer Ashley Kahn looks at the legendary sessions.

FIRST SESSION: MARCH 2, 1959, 2:30 p.m.

LISTEN: "Freddie Freeloader (False Start)"

Take 3 of "Freddie Freeloader" makes it through the familiar theme (loosely based on the melody of "Soft Winds") and on into Wynton Kelly's solo. Before the second chorus of the piano ends, Davis whistles off the take.

Miles Davis: Hey, look, Wynton, don't play no chord going into the A-flat ...

Three points of interest here: First, even after the third take of "Freddie Freeloader," Davis is still tinkering, making small structural changes after calling off the performance with a whistle rather than a shout (made necessary by the permanent damage he caused his vocal cords in 1955 after getting into a shouting match with a club manager).

Second, despite Davis' general compulsion to simplify harmonic rigidity using a modal approach on most of Kind of Blue, he was still a stickler for structural precision — willing to call off a take as Kelly misses an unusual but significant structural twist during his solo. Davis created "Freddie Freeloader" as 24-bar blues, rather than the standard 12-bar form, and he wanted that form followed.

And third, as a bandleader, Davis gave minimal instruction.

"He never told anyone what to play, but would say, 'Man, you don't need to do that,' " Cannonball Adderley recalled in a 1972 radio interview. "Miles really told everybody what not to do. I heard him and dug it."

LISTEN: "Blue in Green (Studio Sequence)"

Irving Townsend: Just you four guys on this, right, Miles?

MD: Five ... No, you play.

Faintly perceptible in the background is Evans' voice, directing the structure of the tune.

IT: CO 62292 — Number 3, Take 1.

The take ends almost immediately. Evans abbreviates the introduction, leading to a brief confirmation of the form.

Bill Evans: We better do that again...

Paul Chambers: Can we start on the last four bars?

BE: That's what I thought...

MD: Last four bars, but then you repeat it.

BE: Oh, do it twice.

MD: So it's eight.

BE: All right.

[Finger snaps.]

IT: Take 2.

Evans plays the introduction, and Davis' muted trumpetis heard as Jimmy Cobb starts playing the snare, using only one brush to achieve a lighter feel than normal. Chambers hits a wrong note and the take breaks down.

[Unintelligible studio chatter.]

MD: Use both hands, Jimmy.

Jimmy Cobb: Huh?

MD: Just use both hands and play it the best way you can. You know, it'll be all right.

There's a wealth of details evident in the dialogue preceding the last tune that day.

As Townsend's question seems to suggest, "Blue in Green" may have been originally intended as a quartet performance — a more contained meeting of Davis and Evans, the two architects behind Kind of Blue. At the last minute, the bandleader informs John Coltrane — whose talent at imbuing a down-tempo ballad with heartbreaking delicacy was then gaining renown — that he should play, as well. Note Davis' standard protocol: He informs the producer first, then asks (or, rather, tells) Coltrane to play on the tune.

In 1986, keyboardist and journalist Ben Sidran asked Davis about Kind of Blue: "Does the success of that record surprise you, Miles? It seems to have been such a simple record in a lot of ways."

"Not back then," Davis replied. "Because Bill Evans, his approach to the piano brought that ... out. He used to bring me pieces by Ravel ... and Bill used to tell me about different modes, which I already knew."

It seemed to require effort at times, but Davis never denied Evans' contribution to, or the collaborative heart of, Kind of Blue. Nowhere is their teamwork more evident than in the ramp-up to the final take of "Blue in Green." Evans took an active role for the first time during the session as the two speak and work out the structure of the tune.

Cobb remembers that, when recording "Blue in Green," Davis' instruction was simple: "I want a floating sound." Uh, OK. Cobb's response was to try a one-handed approach to the brushes. After hearing the result, Davis urged him to play the brushes normally.

SECOND SESSION: APRIL 22, 1959, 2:30 p.m.

LISTEN: "Flamenco Sketches (Studio Sequence 1)"

Cannonball Adderley: Damn thing, right?

MD: Hey, Cannon ...

[Studio chatter and bass playing is heard.]

IT: Take 2.

MD: Wait a minute, Irving ... wait.

IT: OK.

MD (to CA): Hey, when you raise up off the stool, man, you get ... oh, yeah! [Laughs.]

MD (to IT): You know, your floor squeaks, you know. You know what I mean? Can you hear me?

IT: Yeah!

[Unidentified: unintelligible.]

[General laughter.]

MD: Let's go!

CA: That's surface noise, you know.

[PC wipes bass.]

BE: ... surf-ass noise.

John Coltrane: It's all part of the tune, man.

CA: [Laughs.] Surf-ASS noise!

IT: Here we go. Take 2...

The members of the Miles Davis Group arrived in jolly spirits for the second session that produced music for Kind of Blue. The feeling must have been infectious. In reference to Davis insisting on keeping the rattle from the open snare on "So What" at the last session, Townsend announced (or "slated," as it's known in studio parlance) the first take of the afternoon as "Surface Noise."

The good humor persisted: Davis pointed out to Adderley that his chair would make a noise if he stood up during the take, to which the alto saxophonist responded with a zinger that made Davis chuckle, before baiting Townsend by complaining about the studio floor squeaking. The producer acknowledged the ribbing, as Adderley dismissed the concern, calling it "surface noise." Unable to resist a quick pun, Evans chimes in with his own zinger ("surf-ass noise"), and Coltrane mimics Davis' contention that any studio noise is part of the performance. Adderley, catching Evans' pun a beat later, laughs and repeats his line. Not a high point of improvised comedy, but an amusing snapshot of the bonhomie often in play at Davis' sessions back then.
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Post by treitz3 » Sun Aug 21, 2011 10:26 am

Thanks for posting that, Chauss! Pretty cool.

Well, I have been listening to the Muddy Waters "Folk Singer" [24K Gold from Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs]
CD I just got in lately and I'm diggin' it so much, that I have listened to it about three times and I am listening to it again as I type this. Definitely a killer recording and great music to boot. Highly recommended!

Hmmm, just found this. Maybe this is why I like it so much...
Keeping things in a blues vein, the crown jewel of MFSL's catalog has got to be the acoustic Muddy Waters album, "Folk Singer". It won the prestigious Golden Note Award for Best Reissue Recording in 1995 from The Academy for the Advancement of High End Audio. The Ultradisc II CD includes two bonus tracks recorded in April 1964 -- "You Can't Lose What You Ain't Never Had", and the Willie Dixon tune, "The Same Thing". The dynamic range of the recording is breathtaking. You'll swear you're in the middle of the recording studio when you listen to this CD.
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Re: Top Audiophile quality recordings

Post by OconeeOrange » Sun Aug 21, 2011 10:53 am

Have several by Muddy and a couple DVDs.
Back around 1998, we brewed a dark, high hopped beer I named 'Muddy Water'. To make it authentic, we kept Muddy playing too loud all through the brewing session. My neighbors must have liked the guy because no one complained.

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